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Faculty Profiles

Raji Baradwaj

Raji J. Baradwaj, Senior Lecturer
Mathematics and Statistics
Mathematics/Psychology, Room 430
raji@umbc.edu
410-455-2403

Professor Baradwaj is a Senior Lecturer of Statistics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Raji received her Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Mathematics from University of Madras, India in the years 1984 and 1986 respectively. She received a Master’s degree in Statistics from Texas A&M University in 1990. Prior to joining UMBC, Raji taught at University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire from 1991 to 2001. She is actively involved in teaching innovations and incorporating technology in the classroom. Raji is a recipient of the UMBC Carl Weber Excellence in Teaching Award.

What class do you teach and why should a new student consider taking your class during CSI in the summer?
I will be teaching Precalculus (Math 150) in summer. I consider this course to be a skills developing course for the calculus series. For a STEM major, it is highly recommended pre-requisite course.

What is the most important thing a new student will learn from taking your class during CSI in the summer?
Students will get a firsthand experience on the rigor of a course, especially, a math course in college.

Share one tip that you think would be helpful for a new student to know before they start their college career at UMBC.
The learning plan divides activities in three parts — before, during, and after class –, which apply to every covered section of the textbook:

Before class:

  • Study the section in the textbook, and taking into account any announcements in class, in blackboard, or by e-mail specifically for this section.
  • Before you arrive in class, you should have an overview of the material in the section, have read and/or seen several examples for its use, and be ready to attempt the homework problems under the guidance of the instructor.

During class:

  • Follow the lecture which highlights the material and puts it into context.
  • Participate actively in class and try to work out problems at the end of class.
  • By the end of class, you should have obtained answers to your questions and have an idea of how to approach the homework.

After class:

  • Work all assigned homework problems. It may be helpful to re-view some of the worked examples in class at this point.
  • If questions arise, review the textbook, notes from class, and examples in textbook

** TIME MANAGEMENT is a very important aspect in a student’s college life. **


Brian Dunnigan

Brian Dunnigan, Lecturer
English
Fine Arts Bldg , Room Fine Arts 444
bdunni25@msn.com
410-455-2021

Professor Dunnigan is a Lecturer in the English Department at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Brian received his BA in English from UMBC (graduated Magna Cum Laude) and his MA in Literature from American University in Washington, D.C. In addition to attending UMBC, he has worked at UMBC since the Fall of 2003.

What class do you teach and why should a new student consider taking your class during CSI in the summer?
Hello! I will be teaching English 100 for the CSI summer program. Since 2003 I have taught various classes at UMBC: Composition, Literature & Research tutorials. Beyond having a professional interest in all of these courses, my approach to teaching reflects a personal passion for learning and knowledge. While I believe educators have a moral responsibility to openly share knowledge with students, it is also imperative for teachers to create a space where the student voice is heard and respected. English 100 is dedicated to exploring strategies that will allow a student to write effectively about any topic and to do so regardless of the diverse audiences he or she will encounter. Yet, in order to develop the confidence & skills necessary for success in English 100, it is important to know that one’s voice matters. To this end, my English 100 class is about empowering the student voice. This approach not only leads to a more profound understanding of writing, but shows students that the expression of values & thoughts is a necessary skill that extends beyond the walls of academia. English 100 is an excellent opportunity to not only learn the structural components of sound writing, but to also develop strategies that allow writers to elevate their voices above the noise of other people’s claims.

What is the most important thing a new student will learn from taking your class during CSI in the summer?
The most important element of my summer CSI class is critical thinking. While producing structurally sound papers is vitally important in English 100, essays that lack depth and perspective tend to fail as convincing pieces of writing. In this light, English 100 is dedicated to students acknowledging & considering the many facets of any given complex topic. From this perspective, students are able to dissect assumptions and values about society that may have been deemed mythically universal. In short, students leave English 100 with a much more sophisticated understanding of how to effectively communicate with the world around them.

Share one tip that you think would be helpful for a new student to know before they start their college career at UMBC.
My one piece of advice for incoming freshman is to embrace the unexpected! Life is full of so many wonderfully absurd encounters and situations. To accept the common and run away from the unconventional is to miss out on opportunities to grow & learn. Say hello to the unknown and realize that it likely has a lot to teach you.


Sam Riley

Sam Riley, Coordinator of Math, Statistics, and Tutoring
Learning Resources Center
Sherman Hall, Room 349
sriley4@umbc.edu
410-455-2441

Professor Sam Riley is the Coordinator of Mathematics, Statistics, and Tutoring for the Learning Resources Center (LRC). Sam received a BA in Ancient Studies and Math along with a Certificate in Women’s Studies and a MA in Instructional Systems Development from UMBC. In addition to attending UMBC, Sam has worked at UMBC for over 17 years.

What class do you teach and why should a new student consider taking your class during CSI in the summer?
I teach Math 106, any student who feels they are not overly strong in Algebra should consider taking my course over the summer. The Math track at UMBC is difficult, and in order to succeed in Math 150 or Math 155, students need to have a deep understanding of Algebra. Taking it over the summer gives you longer class periods which are used to practice the skills, and will put you on track for your major in the Fall.

What is the most important thing a new student will learn from taking your class during CSI in the summer?
A new student will refresh their understanding of Algebra, and as my course follows the logical progression of math, they will have a better idea of how it is all connected. These connections will help them in their next Math class.

Share one tip that you think would be helpful for a new student to know before they start their college career at UMBC.
New students should be realistic about their background and expect to come to college to learn things that they have already been taught. Just as in High School, you covered many of the same ideas as were presented in Middle School, but in greater background and with more complexity. That is also true here, many of the courses you will take here will have been introduced in high school, but at UMBC, you will go into much more depth for a greater understanding.


D. webb

Deb Webb, Coordinator of the Supplemental Instruction/PASS Program
Learning Resources Center
Sherman Hall, Room 348
debwebb@umbc.edu
410-455-2467

Professor Deb Webb is the Coordinator of the SI/PASS program for the Learning Resources Center (LRC). Deb received an Associates of Science in Industrial and Digital Electronics from CCBC, and a Bachelor’s of Science in Computer Information Systems and a Masters of Education in Instructional Technology from UMUC. Deb has taught LRC 099 (algebra 1), MATH 104, and MATH 106 at UMBC, and she also teaches a variety of math classes at AACC.

What class do you teach and why should a new student consider taking your class during CSI in the summer?
I will be teaching Math 104 during the second summer session. This course is a new course designed for non-STEM majors and will prepare students for MATH 120 (Contemporary Mathematics) or STAT 121 (Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences). Students who do not need an algebra-intensive course for their major should definitely take MATH 104.

What is the most important thing a new student will learn from taking your class during CSI in the summer?
Students will learn the foundations of mathematics with real-world applications and examples that they can relate to. Understanding these basic concepts will help students in their subsequent math course and in life.

Share one tip that you think would be helpful for a new student to know before they start their college career at UMBC.
Students should work on math concepts for at least 30 minutes per day. Remember the old adage, “practice makes perfect”. Practicing problem-solving will help students gain a better understanding of the material, make connections, build confidence, and discover how math not only relates to their everyday lives but how it can be fun as well.