Skip to Main Content

2015 – 2016 Courses

NOTE: First-Year Seminars are open to all students during their first year at UMBC.

Fall 2015 | Spring 2016

Fall 2015:

FYS 101: First Year Seminars

meets Arts and Humanities (AH) requirements

Building a Culture of Peace: What Would it Take?

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
TuTh 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building 124
Joby Taylor

Will engage students in investigating the diverse meanings and methods operating in the study and practice of peace. The course will include an interdisciplinary exploration of primary texts, key terms, major theories and methods, and a guest presentation. There will also be individualized research opportunities for students that will result in critical and creative essays across a range of interrelated topics and build toward an overall course learning portfolio.


Discussing Classics

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
MoWe 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Math & Psychology 102
David Irvine

Discussing Classics has two major objectives. First, to read some short excerpts from western (and some non-western) thinkers. A who’s who of intellectuals, going back over two thousand years. The second objective it deliberately work on building a good discussion group. Thus, in every class, there will be two agendas: What is the text talking about? How are we functioning as a group? This is an active discussion group, so come prepared to take part. There are no back-seats in this class.


Picture and Story

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
TuTh 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building 123
Robert Sloane

"A picture is worth a thousand words," perhaps, but does it tell a story? And, if so, how? This course will explore pictures (especially photographs) and contemporary stories (fiction and journalism) to see if working with basic elements of narrative (setting, character, action, point-of-view) can lead to a richer understanding of pictures, and, conversely, how the study of pictures (their composition, subtext, and context) might deepen our understanding of stories. Students will work individually and in groups to develop short analytical papers and presentations. They will learn about larger historical, cultural, and aesthetic “narratives” which help inform the works, and try their hand at making pictures and stories themselves. In the process, they will examine their own pictorial and narrative practices in everyday life.


Truth and Technology

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
TuTh 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building 428
Elaine MacDougall

In Truth and Technology, Relationships and Happiness in a Technological World students will explore the changing nature of relationships in post-modern culture and our ongoing search for happiness. Students will explore their relationships and interactions with others, as well as their relationship with nature, and the relationships depicted in literature, film, and journal articles in an effort to come to some conclusion about the importance of face-to-face communication in our highly technological world. As a requirement of this course, students will take part in a service learning experience to connect the ideas of community and human interaction.


Happiness and a Valuable Life

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
TuTh 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building 428
Lisa Beall

In this seminar students will explore… What makes a life valuable? How should we aspire to live? Should it be for happiness? For love? These are questions are essential if we are to live a fulfilled life, and to define our goals and dreams. This course aims to construct a path through the thicket, so to speak, using a combination of fiction, non-fiction, philosophy, essay, and written reflection that challenges us to define our own answers to these questions. The course will focus on analytical thinking and reading, self-examination, writing, discussion, and finally, a creative presentation to unveil your personal philosophy through the medium of your choice.


Defining and Pursuing Prosperity

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
TuTh 4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 113
Lisa Beall

How do we define the “good life”? Is success defined by money, possessions, and status or are there other, just as important, ways to achieve prosperity? What limits are placed on individual success by culture, class systems, and/or access to opportunity? How do we determine professional and personal standards of success? In this seminar, students will examine the concepts of wealth and prosperity as represented in literature, drama, history, psychology, and religion. The experiences of characters from text and film will be analyzed for how wealth and prosperity (in whatever way they are defined) can impact an individual and the society in which he/she lives in both positive and negative ways. Through class activities and out-of-class assignments, students will begin to identify the “wealth” they currently have, what they desire, the means for achieving their desired forms of wealth, and to consider forms of wealth and prosperity that have yet to be defined for them. Determining a personal definition of prosperity is the first step toward establishing goals and making plans for attaining them.


Perspectives on the Heroic Journey

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
Th 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Fine Arts 002
Steven McAlpine

The Heroic Journey asks what makes someone heroic? What happens when heroes fall? From ancient myth to modern films such as The Matrix and Harry Potter, the story of the ordinary man or woman who is called to an extraordinary journey has been told in a thousand different ways. At the heart of our fascination with the heroic story is the belief that in each of us lies untapped potential to change the world, that we possess a latent power that only needs a call to action. What if we viewed our journeys through higher education as a call to heroic adventures? Through the lenses of science (are we "hardwired" for heroic behavior?), psychology, mythology (ancient Greek heroes such as Odysseus), philosophy (do heroes have a stronger ethical impetus?), theology, and the arts, we will explore how the heroic journey is a necessary step in the construction of one¿s identity in order to answer the question, "who am I, and what am I called to do in the world?


It Came from the `80s: Politic Political, social, and cultural changes of the 1980s

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
TuTh 10 a.m – 11:15 a.m.
Sherman Hall 109
Jeremy Spahr
or
Fri 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
Sherman Hall 006
Staff

The 1980s saw the rise of modern conservatism with the election of Ronald Reagan, the end of the Cold War, and a vast expansion in consumer culture. All of these changes were reflected and influenced by the popular culture of the 1980s in film, television, and music. This course examines the political, social, and cultural changes of the 1980s, and the way these changes were portrayed and even shaped by the popular culture of the decade. Students will choose a historical event from the 1980s and examine how popular culture interpreted the event, often in contrast with the views and valuations of historians.


FYS 102: First Year Seminars

meets Social Sciences (SS) requirements

Learning About, With, and From Students with Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary and Integrated Approach

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
Fr 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 013
Michele Wolff

Learning About, With, and From Students with Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary and Integrated Approach is an interdisciplinary course designed to offer a comprehensive exploration of intellectual and developmental disabilities through the lens of Sociology, Psychology, Visual Arts, Education, Information Systems, Theater, Dance and other disciplines. The course will include cohorts of full-time UMBC students and non-degree seeking students enrolled in a new college-based program for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, UMBC SUCCESS (Students United for Campus-Community Engagement for Post-Secondary Success). This course will assist the full-time UMBC students in gaining a comprehensive, multidisciplinary understanding of intellectual and development disabilities, while providing a unique and substantive college-based experience for a cohort of non-degree seeking college-aged students with intellectual and development disabilities who are enrolled as participants in UMBC SUCCESS. The full-time UMBC students will explore the theoretical underpinnings of a range of intellectual and development disabilities from a multidisciplinary perspective. Faculty from Sociology, Psychology, Visual Arts, Education, Theater, Information Systems, and Dance (among others) will share the theories of their disciplines along with the practical application of these theories. Activities, grounded in these theories, will be used as a framework for engaging the full-time UMBC students with the UMBC SUCCESS students in interactive, experiential activities so that they can learn about, with, and from each other.


Diversity, Ethics and Social Justice in Schooling

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
Mo 3 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 208
Vickie Williams

This course will explore and mediate the tension between the current climate of school reform and the learning needs of highly diverse students through the lens of multicultural classrooms in diverse schools. In multicultural America, classrooms mirror the diverse nature of children¿s backgrounds, cultural experiences, languages, and ¿ways of knowing¿. This course offers opportunities to learn about the challenges of local schools firsthand and to understand the implementation of federal and local policies aimed at supporting the academic success of all students, regardless of cultural, linguistic, ethnic, or diverse backgrounds. The course will first examine the multicultural nature of society and schools. Then, “Brown v. the Board of Education” will be revisited as a foundation for understanding the legal, political, and social forces that impact a multicultural education system.


Poverty Amidst Plenty: The Economics of American Poverty

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
TuTh 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Janet & Walter Sondheim 107
Nandita Dasgupta

Poverty is not an oft-quoted word in USA. Nonetheless, the phenomenon is worth exploring especially in the backdrop of the Great Recession that US has recently experienced. With continuing unemployment and increasing costs of living, more and more families have to choose between necessities like health care, child care, and even food. This seminar will examine the nature and extent of poverty in the U.S., its causes and consequences, and the poverty alleviation measures adopted through government programs and policies.


The Deaf Community and Its Culture

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
Mo 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Performing Arts & Humanities Building 124
Denise Perdue

Through lectures, directed readings, attendance at deaf community events, and student research presentations, this course will introduce students the American Deaf Community, their unique culture, history and language. This course will also highlight significant impacts that American education systems, laws, and technologies have had on the Deaf Community’s social status. The course will have several guest speakers, both Deaf and hearing, who will explore specific topics in depth such as CODA, Deaf Education, Interpreting, and Audism.


Conflict Resolution Education: Handling Conflict Constructively

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
Th 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Information Technology 237
Lauren Mauriello

One of the National Education Goals is the creation of safe and constructive learning environments. Educators are increasingly aware of the need to build community in classrooms and schools in order to help students have such environments. A key component of that is conflict resolution education. This course introduces students to the broad field of CRE (including social and emotional learning, anti-bullying programs, peer mediation, negotiation processes, expressive arts, restorative justice programs, and bias awareness programs). The course provides students with examples of programs and encourages them to consider how they can support and utilize these programs as teachers and administrators.


Creativity, Innovation, and Invention

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
Tu 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Meyerhoff Chemistry 272
Gilbert Mason

This course is for undergraduate students of all majors to explore the invention process from the germination of an idea to the development of a prototype in order to solve problems that address everyday needs. The purpose of the course is to inspire creativity and motivate students to invent, and supply them with the minimum expertise necessary to design, market, and protect an invention. Students will work in “active-learning” I-teams that will assume responsibility for tasks that are important to the development and success of their invention. Students will essentially act as the divisions of a company that are all working toward a common purpose.


Maternity, Race, and Policy

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
MoWeFr 11 a.m. – 11:50 p.m.
Math & Psychology 102
Tammy Henderson

An introduction to the ways in which race shapes discourses, cultural practices, and public policies related to maternity, motherhood, and child rearing in contemporary America. This course will explore how each of these conversations intersect and alter when explored through the lens of race. Are African American mothers judged more harshly in the justice system, pop culture or in public discourse versus non-black mothers? We will explore issues like these surrounding maternity by reviewing case studies, film and pop culture representations. Students will engage in critical thinking which will be the focus of group projects and presentations by using current research.


Social Issues in Business

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
We 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Performing Arts & Humanities Building 124
Carlton Crabtree

Successful innovations are achieved when people work together. This seminar introduces students to business concepts through collaboration and practical application including a group project to research a company business model that benefits society. Cultural dimensions affect the way companies promote products and services internationally. In this context, we also examine how social media influences consumer perceptions and organizational change. Students learn theories in business communication, corporate culture, ethics, and decision making. Leadership skills acquired in this course are foundational to any discipline.


Images of Madness

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
Th 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Meyerhoff Chemistry 256
Carolyn Tice

In contemporary society, virtually everyone goes to movie theaters or views feature films at home on videos, DVD’s or television. For many people, films, regardless of their accuracy, serve as a major source of information on social issues, including mental illness. This course reviews Academy Award winning films depicting mental illness to consider the influence of motion pictures on the public perception of social issues, policies, and services. Beginning with The Snake Pit (1948) through As Good as it Gets (1997), students analyze films using a historical framework and in conjunction with assigned readings that address cultural stereotypes, societal attitudes, and the public’s response toward people with mental illness.


Debating America: Ideology and Language in Modern American Politics

(SS) GEP, (SS) GFR
TuTh 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Meyerhoff Chemistry 256
Jeremy Spahr
or
We 4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 208
C Randles, Laila Shishineh
or
Fr 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 006
Christine Powers

This course will introduce students to the concept of ideological debates as a political tool, focusing on the techniques interest groups involved in "hot button" political issues use to define those issues in ways that promote their desired policy outcome. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic issues related to financial literacy, such as the Federal Reserve, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and the national debt. The course will utilize sociological tools as well as historical techniques of textual analysis to assess how different groups seek to define "America" in different, often contradictory ways.


FYS 103: First Year Seminars

meets Science non-lab (S, non-lab) requirement

Paradigms and Paradoxes: An Attempt to Understand the Universe

(S, non-lab) GEP, (S, non-lab) GFR
MoWe 1 p.m. – 2:15 .pm.
Meyerhoff Chemistry 272
Joel Liebman

There are at least two kinds of scientific activities: acquiring and generating data, and inquiring and generating general modes of understanding. The latter activities will dominate this course. The course contents include discussions of some remarkable features of the universe: the class discussions will require no more scientific background than gained from high school chemistry and mathematics. Some topics for the course follow.

Matter doesn’t collapse, shrink or disappear – it has size, weight, and sometimes shape. We take this for granted. Don’t we? Positive and negative charges attract. The atomic nucleus is positive and electrons are negative. Why don’t these parts of atoms get closer and closer and ¿ closer, and eventually collapse? In other words, we ask, not only why are atoms so small but also why are they so big? This topic is not merely philosophical. Questions of fuel efficiency and national defense arise as naturally as those of the existence of the universe. There are 26 letters in the English alphabet. There are 4 letters in the genetic code and some 100 chemical elements in the periodic table. There are millions of distinct words, individual types of organisms and chemical compounds. Are these numbers 26, 4 and 100 small or are they large? As such, our study includes the nature of language, information and life. Consider the number 3.14159265357988; can you identify it? Answering this question should be as easy as pie. Hatmakers equate this number to 3. Is this a rational choice? Answering this question tells us about the nature of numbers, measurement, design, and industry, and also about the answerer.


FYS 107: First Year Seminars

meets Arts and Humanities, Culture (AH/C) requirement

American Orientalism

(AH) GEP, (AH) GFR
TuTh 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Sherman Hall 006
Autumn Reed
or
Fr 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 207
Staff

This course will introduce students to the concept of Orientalism through the lens of the United States’s changing relationship with and representations of the Middle East since the late 19th century. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which gender, sexuality, race, nation, class, and religion intersect in U.S. cultural productions of the Middle East. Throughout the semester, students will interact with a variety of cultural texts, including art, literature, film, and the news to identify and assess U.S. Orientalism.

 


NOTE: First-Year Seminars are open to all students during their first year at UMBC.

Spring 2016

FYS 101: First Year Seminars

meets Arts and Humanities (AH) requirements

Creating Stories about Times of Change
TuTh 4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building 124
Galina Madjaroff

This course explores common themes in both adolescence and aging, stages in life that can transform a person’s sense of identity. In intergenerational teams, students will explore changes in their identities by producing video stories together that will focus on common threads, shared insights and lessons about growth. The narrative collaboration will offer opportunities for empathy and broadening of perspective, and participants will gain wisdom about creating identity in times of change.


Defining and Pursuing Prosperity
TuTh 4 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 113
Lisa Beall

How do we define the "good life"? Is success defined by money, possessions, and status or are there other, just as important, ways to achieve prosperity? What limits are placed on individual success by culture, class systems, and/or access to opportunity? How do we determine professional and personal standards of success? In this seminar, students will examine the concepts of wealth and prosperity as represented in literature, drama, history, psychology, and religion. The experiences of characters from text and film will be analyzed for how wealth and prosperity (in whatever way they are defined) can impact an individual and the society in which he/she lives in both positive and negative ways. Through class activities and out-of-class assignments, students will begin to identify the "wealth" they currently have, what they desire, the means for achieving their desired forms of wealth, and to consider forms of wealth and prosperity that have yet to be defined for them. Determining a personal definition of prosperity is the first step toward establishing goals and making plans for attaining them.


Discussing Classics
TuTh 10 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building 124
David Irvine

Discussing Classics has two major objectives: To discuss excerpts of twenty classics, (such as The Handbook of Epictetus), and to develop discussion skills. To that end, each reading is preceded by a short piece pointing out its relation to some aspect of discussion groups. Thus, in every class, there will be two agendas: What is the text talking about? How are we functioning as a group? This is an active discussion group, so come prepared to take part. There are no back seats in this class.


EnGENDERing Popular Culture
Mo 7 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Fine Arts 015
Emerald Christopher-Byrd

This course will illuminate the ways in which we are passive consumers of popular culture and empower individuals to become critical participants. Popular culture is all around us. It influences how we think, feel, vote, and live our lives. This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the study of U.S. popular culture and aims to examine the multiple ways gender has been portrayed in various popular cultural forms. Through an intersectional and intertextual investigation of television, film, popular music, advertisement, and social media, we will explore how representation as objects, consumers, subjects, creators, challengers, and critics both reflect and produce socio-cultural phenomena and ideas about the proper role of women and men in society. Throughout this course, we will consider the intersections of gender, sex, and race and analyze how they are articulated in popular culture.


Happiness and a Valuable Life
TuTh 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Information Technology 237
Lisa Beall

In this seminar students will explore… What makes a life valuable? How should we aspire to live? Should it be for happiness? For love? These are questions are essential if we are to live a fulfilled life, and to define our goals and dreams. This course aims to construct a path through the thicket, so to speak, using a combination of fiction, non-fiction, philosophy, essay, and written reflection that challenges us to define our own answers to these questions. The course will focus on analytical thinking and reading, self-examination, writing, discussion, and finally, a creative presentation to unveil your personal philosophy through the medium of your choice.


It Came from the `80s: Political, Social, and Cultural Changes of the 1980s
TuTh 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Fine Arts 424
Jeremy Spahr

The 1980s saw the rise of modern conservatism with the election of Ronald Reagan, the end of the Cold War, and a vast expansion in consumer culture. All of these changes were reflected and influenced by the popular culture of the 1980s in film, television, and music. This course examines the political, social, and cultural changes of the 1980s, and the way these changes were portrayed and even shaped by the popular culture of the decade. Students will choose a historical event from the 1980s and examine how popular culture interpreted the event, often in contrast with the views and valuations of historians.


Perspectives on the Heroic Journey
Th 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Fine Arts 015
Steven McAlpine

The Heroic Journey asks what makes someone heroic? What happens when heroes fall? From ancient myth to modern films such as The Matrix and Harry Potter, the story of the ordinary man or woman who is called to an extraordinary journey has been told in a thousand different ways. At the heart of our fascination with the heroic story is the belief that in each of us lies untapped potential to change the world, that we possess a latent power that only needs a call to action. What if we viewed our journeys through higher education as a call to heroic adventures? Through the lenses of science (are we "hardwired" for heroic behavior?), psychology, mythology (ancient Greek heroes such as Odysseus), philosophy (do heroes have a stronger ethical impetus?), theology, and the arts, we will explore how the heroic journey is a necessary step in the construction of one’s identity in order to answer the question, “who am I, and what am I called to do in the world?”


Truth and Technology: Relationships and Happiness in a Technological World
TuTh 10 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
Information Technology 237
Elaine MacDougall

In Truth and Technology, Relationships and Happiness in a Technological World students will explore the changing nature of relationships in post-modern culture and our ongoing search for happiness. Students will explore their relationships and interactions with others, as well as their relationship with nature, and the relationships depicted in literature, film, and journal articles in an effort to come to some conclusion about the importance of face-to-face communication in our highly technological world. As a requirement of this course, students will take part in a service-learning experience to connect the ideas of community and human interaction.


Turning to One Another: Beliefs and Behaviors
TuTh 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Performing Arts and Humanities Building 123
Jill Randles, Diane Lee

Turning to One Another: Beliefs and Behaviors explores the scientific, aesthetic, and ethical dimensions of thought and behavior. This course is oriented towards the exploration of questions that are both personal and global in their orientation. For example: What is my faith in the future? What do I believe about others? What is the relationship I want with the earth? When and where do I experience the sacred? There will be opportunities for conversation around topics such as these, literally a "turning to one another" in order to expand and inform our understanding of how our beliefs and behaviors have the power to transform.


FYS 102: First Year Seminars

meets Social Sciences (SS) requirements

Debating America: Ideology and Language in Modern American Politics
TuTh 10 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
Sherman Hall 109
Jeremy Spahr

This course will introduce students to the concept of ideological debates as a political tool, focusing on the techniques interest groups involved in "hot button" political issues use to define those issues in ways that promote their desired policy outcome. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic issues related to financial literacy, such as the Federal Reserve, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and the national debt. The course will utilize sociological tools as well as historical techniques of textual analysis to assess how different groups seek to define "America" in different, often contradictory ways.


Diversity, Ethics and Social Justice in Schooling
Mo 3 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Sherman Hall 208
Vickie Williams

This is a hybrid course with in class meeting time on Mondays 3:00-4:15p.m. Remaining course expectations will be determined by instructor.
This course will explore and mediate the tension between the current climate of school reform and the learning needs of highly diverse students through the lens of multicultural classrooms in diverse schools. In multicultural America, classrooms mirror the diverse nature of children’s backgrounds, cultural experiences, languages, and “ways of knowing”. This course offers opportunities to learn about the challenges of local schools firsthand and to understand the implementation of federal and local policies aimed at supporting the academic success of all students, regardless of cultural, linguistic, ethnic, or diverse backgrounds. The course will first examine the multicultural nature of society and schools. Then, Brown v. the Board of Education will be revisited as a foundation for understanding the legal, political, and social forces that impact a multicultural education system.


Exploring Mixed Identities
TuTh 7 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Sherman Hall 207
Emerald Christopher-Byrd

The aim of this course is to move beyond prevalent monoracial discourses by examining identities and experiences from a mixed race/mixed ethnicity perspective. This course explores many topics such as the history of racialization, processes of othering, acceptance and the politics of claiming, the role of education in racial formation (and vice versa), interracial dating, white and non-white mixed identities, transnational and transracial adoptions, and hybridity. This course will be interactive and discussion based.


Politics of Language American Society
TuTh 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
ITE 239
Autumn Reed

The Politics of Language in American Society introduces students to the relationship between language and power. Using a case-study approach, students explore language use in such contexts as advertising, politics, the news, family/social groups, medical settings, and the classroom/academia. To examine language in these arenas, students will learn the theoretical and methodological approach of critical discourse analysis (CDA), which they will apply to uncover hidden manifestations of power within these contexts as they relate to gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, nationality, religion, and ability.


Poverty Amidst Plenty: The Economics of American Poverty
Time: TBA
Location: TBA
Nandita Dasgupta

Poverty is not an oft-quoted word in USA. Nonetheless, the phenomenon is worth exploring, especially in the context of the Great Recession that the United States has recently experienced. With continuing unemployment and increasing costs of living, more and more families have to choose between necessities like health care, child care, and even food. This seminar will examine the nature and extent of poverty in the U.S., its causes and consequences, and the poverty alleviation measures adopted through government programs and policies.


Social Issues in Business
Mo 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Fine Arts 427
Carlton Crabtree

Successful innovations are achieved when people work together. This seminar introduces students to business concepts through collaboration and practical application including a group project to research a company business model that benefits society. Cultural dimensions affect the way companies promote products and services internationally. In this context, we also examine how social media influences consumer perceptions and organizational change. Students learn theories in business communication, corporate culture, ethics, and decision making. Leadership skills acquired in this course are foundational to any discipline.


FYS 108: First Year Seminars

meets Mathematics (M) requirement

Pre-req: Students enrolling in this class must have completed Math 106 or its equivalent or placed above Math 106 on placement exams.

Mathematics in Literature
TuTh 1 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Fine Arts 526
Catherine Kruchten

Throughout history, humans have told and written stories to help make sense of the world. So why not use stories to help us understand even difficult mathematical concepts? In this course, we will examine mathematical constructs in literary contexts, from concrete patterns and shapes to abstract reasoning and logic, using a variety of fiction including detective stories and children’s literature. Students will use readings to gain new insights into mathematics, lead discussions to help understand the texts, and practice their own skills by developing their own mathematical narratives.

For More Information, Please Contact:
Jill Randles
Assistant Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education
jrandles@umbc.edu | (410) 455-3715